Monday, 23 June 2014

Pesh Joomang, the Gate and the Keeper

This was originally intended as a perk for the Angels, Daemons, & Beings Between Indiegogo project. As far as I know, no one ever received a copy of Pesh Joomang, the Ultimate Patron, as a benefit of funding. As full payment for the project included two hard copies of all materials, which were never received, and as my attempts to contact project head Sean Connors have failed utterly, I have decided to share Pesh Joomang here.

If Sean would like me to take the material down, or wishes to make any claim to it, let him contact me.

If you look at the patron's name, and remember the fondness for anagrams and near-anagrams that infused the early hobby, you will understand the patron better. If I had been writing this now, there would be some real differences - there would be reference to Pesh Joomang as "the Dark Master", for instance, and I would have had a lot more material to work with for his henchmen. I would certainly have found a way to work Doug Kovacs into the equation!

You may need to go back to 2012 to fully "get" the artifacts mentioned herein, but I imagine that some readers may even now be wearing the mystic Buckle of Pesh Joomang or the Tunic.

Without further ado:

Pesh Joomang, the Gate and the Keeper

In the Lands of the Sau, long ago, dwelt the sages Yaggyx and Sarnon, who distilled the visions of a slew of prior wizards and scribes into several great tomes of lore and magic.  But, as time passed, Tarot Wizards wrested the tomes from the great sages.  What Yaggyx and Sarnon had wrought was distorted and lost.  Indeed, there were some who felt that the Old Magic had never truly existed, and that tales of a long-lost Golden Age were but illusions of memory.

It was Pesh Joomang who tracked back through the works of the great sages, rediscovering the pandects of the scribes who came before Yaggyx and Sarnon, and so renewed the fires of the Old Magic.  Pesh Joomang is both the Keeper of, and the Gate to, the Old Magic.  Some claim that he is the greatest patron of them all.

It is not a simple matter to gain Pesh Joomang as a patron.  The aspirant must first track him down through the auspices of not less than three other patrons, to each of which he must be bonded.  One of these patrons must be from the Core Rulebook, for these patrons are closest to the creations of Pesh Joomang; one must be from Angels, Daemons, and Beings Between, for the creators of that volume first beheld Pesh Joomang as the Gate and the Keeper, and those patrons are bound to his will and his approval.  The third patron may come from any source.

Even then, it is not a simple matter to bond with this powerful patron.  Pesh Joomang demands that his ritual be carried out in a place where great wonders, great deeds, or great games of chance have taken place.  Further, Pesh Joomang always demands some great sacrifice from he who would have Pesh Joomang as his patron, and at least one quest, and quite probably more.  The quests of Pesh Joomang are known for their deviousness, although those who survive them are almost always the better for it.

Finally, Pesh Joomang cares little for those who have not already demonstrated their worth, and seldom grants power to lesser mortals.  A 1st level wizard or elf who seeks to bond with Pesh Joomang has a –10 penalty to the patron bond spell, as well as to all invoke patron and patron spell checks if he succeeds.  At level 2, this penalty is reduced to –8.  At level 3, –4, and level 4, –2.  At level 5 and above, there is no penalty.

Invoke Patron check results:

When a wizard or elf with Pesh Joomang as a patron casts invoke patron, he has a choice to either invoke Pesh Joomang, or to invoke another patron to which he has bonded through Pesh Joomang.  If the caster does the former, use the chart below.  If the caster does the latter, use the chart for the patron invoked, but the caster gains the next higher result from the one rolled.  For example, an elf might say, “Through the power of Pesh Joomang, I call upon Logos the Perfect Form!”  This would mean that he would owe both Pesh Joomang and Logos a favour, but he would gain a higher result, and on a natural “1” would suffer patron taint from Pesh Joomang alone.

12-13
The Greatest of Patrons is hard at work, scribing the words which will set another group of hapless adventurers onto a quest for gold and glory.  Yet, he has a moment’s time to provide you   some meagre assistance.  A field of magical energy distorts and warps a target you select, within 100’, causing it 2d6 damage.  In addition, unless it succeeds in a DC 15 Will save, the target suffers the effects of greater corruption (page 119 of the core rulebook).
14-17
An eruption of tiny imps boils out from the ground, at a point not more than 100’ from the caster, and filling a 20’ x 20’ area, which can overlap with other creatures.  The tiny imps are seen to be wearing red and white tunics, with a sigil like unto a horned black skull on the front.  They pelt all enemies of the caster and Pesh Joomang with hard polyhedral shapes of various configurations and sizes, making an attack against all such creatures within their space or within 5’ of it.  The imps last 2d7 rounds; at the end of this time, they and all their equipment fade away in a swirling prismatic cloud.  Imp horde:  Init +2, Atk pelt +4 melee against all in a 20’ x 20’ space or within 5’ thereof (dmg 1d5); AC 8; HP 40; MV 20’; Act 1; SV Fort +4, Ref +2, Will +0; AL C.
18-19
Pesh Joomang plucks the caster from his current predicament, teleporting him to some region that amuses the Gate and the Keeper.  Roll 1d14:  1-10, the caster is within 100 miles of his starting location; 11-12, the caster is somewhere on the same world, but need not be even remotely near his starting position; 13, the caster is on another world; or 14, the caster is on another plane.  Roll 1d3:  1-2, the caster is alone; or 3, the caster’s allies within 100’ are transported with him.  Roll 1d5:  1-2, those transported are abandoned; 3-4, those transported need merely survive for 2d7 minutes, and then are transported back; or 5, those transported must fulfil some mission (adventure) for Pesh Joomang before they are returned from whence they came.  This mission is in addition to the favour owed for the invoke patron spell.
20-23
Fear No Rule:  Pesh Joomang makes the caster immune to the consequences of a single rule, chosen by the judge, for a period equal to 1d6+CL rounds.  This may mean that the rule behaves differently for the caster, or is in complete abeyance.  The judge has wide discretion as to how this works, but some examples include:  The caster can move freely in combat without provoking extra attacks; The caster is immune to critical hits; The caster gains no corruption or spell loss on a failed spell check; The caster cannot be harmed by falling; or The caster is completely immune to one spell or weapon.  The judge is encouraged to wait until events dictate a rule that would benefit the caster to ignore before deciding what the exact effect is; thereafter it is set for whatever part of the duration remains.
24-27
Pesh Joomang interferes directly with the caster’s fate.  For 2d7 rounds, the caster may spend 1   point of Luck to gain a +3 bonus to any attack roll, damage roll, skill check, saving throw, or spell check that he makes.  The caster may also burn 1 point of Luck to reduce the damage from any successful attack made against him to 1 point.  The caster may instead burn 2 points of Luck to ensure the minimum success in an attack roll, skill check, saving throw, or spell check; the caster still rolls, but anything below the minimum threshold of success is automatically “bumped up” to the minimum success – even if a natural “1” is rolled!  Moreover, the caster can burn 2 points of Luck to completely avoid any attack, so that no damage or special effect from the attack occurs.
28-29
Favoured of Joomang:  The judge grabs three random dice and rolls them.  The caster gains temporary hit points equal to the total result, which last until they are reduced by damage (or other causes).  All damage is taken from these temporary hit points first.  So long as the caster has even one temporary hit point remaining, his AC benefits from a +2 bonus.  Yet this beneficence does not come without a price – the caster takes a temporary –2 penalty to Luck so long as he has even one of these temporary hit points, and he rolls for attack roll fumbles using one die up on the die chain.
30-31
Pesh Joomang sends two of his extradimensional henchmen to aid the caster:  Harstrow the Harrower and Kur’tis the Colossus.  These doughty planar beings arrive within 1d3 rounds, and remain for 1d16+CL rounds before departing back to their respective home planes. 

Harstrow the Harrower appears as a blue-skinned man with the head of a demonic hound, and wielding a massive three-headed black iron flail.  His breastplate is bedecked with jewels stolen from a forgotten goddess.  Any creature bit by Harstrow must make a DC 15 Will save or flee in abject terror for 3d6 rounds, throwing down any held object when doing so.  He uses 1d8 on Crit Table DN for critical hits.

Kur’tis the Colossus appears as an 8-foot-tall, heavily muscled man with the head of a gorilla and large black feathered wings.  Despite his appearance, Kur’tis is fully amphibious, and was said to   be a paramour of Great Queen who ruled beneath the waves.  He is capable of making a croaking noise once per day that stuns foes within 30’ unless they succeed in a DC 15 Fort save.  Stunned foes are not helpless, but can take no actions for 1d7 rounds.  He uses 1d6 on the Crit Table G for critical hits.

Both of these henchmen know and can cast any of Pesh Joomang’s patron spells with their action dice, with a +6 bonus to the spell check.  If either of these champions is reduced to 0 hit points, he is not slain, but merely forced to return to his own plane.  There they create situations and quests that Pesh Joomang can put in the way of mortal subjects for his amusement.

Harstrow the Harrower:  Init +4; Atk three-headed mace +6 melee (1d8+8) or bite +4 melee (1d6 plus fear); AC 18; HP 80; MV 30’; Act 2d20; SP spells, fear; SV Fort +6, Ref +4, Will +10; AL C.

Kur’tis the Colossus:  Init +3; Atk curved sword +8 melee (2d8+8) or bite +6 melee (2d6+6); AC 16; HP 48; MV 40’ or fly 30’ or swim 50’; SP spells, croaking 1/day; SV Fort +10, Ref +4, Will +10; AL L.
32+
Pesh Joomang takes a personal interest in the caster, granting him a +8 bonus to AC for 1d14+CL rounds, as well as 30 temporary hit points that last until used (as per 28-29, above).  Further, if any of the caster’s companions are slain within the next 1d6 minutes, the caster may find him alive and healed by completing a quest chosen by Pesh Joomang within the next seven days.  For each additional companion who must be recovered, the time to complete the quest is reduced by 1 day, to a minimum of 1 day.  This quest is either an adventure especially created by the judge, or any published adventure chosen by the judge.  The adventure need not be in the typical fantasy genre, although some preparation may be required to convert adventures to the Dungeon Crawl Classics rules.  If the judge desires, the current time frame can be “frozen”, as Pesh Joomang whirls the caster and his allies to the new adventure location, and then brings them back to the original adventure a mere second after they left.

Patron Taint:  Pesh Joomang


It is said that, before the coming of Pesh Joomang, there were whole universes whose magic contained no more mystery than science.  Some of the patron taint associated with Pesh Joomang reflects how Pesh Joomang has added a more random – some might say, a more “magical” – element to the forces that shape the multiple universes and all magic within them.  Other taints reflect a certain aesthetic that Pesh Joomang has adopted, his love of arcane tomes, and his desire to witness and encourage great adventures.

Roll
Result
1
Patron Warp:  When this taint is rolled, the judge chooses or randomly selects another patron active in the campaign milieu.  Patron taint is then rolled as if for that patron.  Pesh Joomang is the Gate and the Keeper, and all patron magic ultimately comes about through him.  Depending upon the caster and the taint, the judge may determine that the taint behaves differently for the caster.  For example, a Chaotic caster would not be worried about the Chaos Taint gained through the Three Fates, and therefore would experience no secondary effect.  There is no limit to how many times this taint may be rolled, although the normal limits apply to each warped patron taint, so that, for example, many patron taints can only be gained three times.
2
Mercurial Magic:  When this taint is first rolled, the caster must reroll the mercurial magic effect of one random spell known to him, using his current Luck modifier.  When this taint is rolled a second time, the caster must reroll the mercurial magic effect of three random spells known to him, using his current Luck modifier.  When this taint is rolled a third time, the caster must reroll the mercurial magic results on all spells known to him, using his current Luck modifier.  In all cases, the newly rolled mercurial magic result replaces (rather than augments) whatever mercurial magic results were in place for the affected spell.  This taint can only be gained three times.
3
Arcane Tomes:  Somehow, when the character seeks for them, even the smallest village can uncover some arcane writing attributed to Pesh Joomang, or one of his henchmen (such as, but not limited to, Harstrow the Harrower and Kur’tis the Colossus).  When this taint is first rolled, the caster must spend 1d5 gp each month on such tomes and pandects – which, although they might not be practical for day-to-day adventuring, are certainly entertaining.  When this taint is rolled a second time, the caster must spend 2d7 gp each month on these materials.  When this taint is rolled a third and final time, the amount increases to 2d16 gp each month.  Whenever the caster is unable to make these purchases, he is uneasy, and suffers a cumulative –1 penalty to all spell checks per gold piece unspent, until his deficit in purchases has been made up for.  If a character without this taint goes searching for the same material, it is impossible to find, as either no one understands what the seeker is asking for, or the last scribed copy has just been sold.
4
Games of Pesh Joomang:  Certain of the tomes of Pesh Joomang describe remarkable arcane games whose participants can experience awe and grandeur, or horror and disillusionment.  When this patron taint is first rolled, the caster becomes involved in playing such games.  Strange beings come to visit him in order to play these games as well – these beings may be human or not, as the judge desires.  An aura of mystery surrounds the entire affair.  When this taint is rolled the first time, the caster spends one day every month playing these games.  When it is rolled a second time, the caster spends one day every two weeks.  When rolled a third time, the caster spends one day each week.  If the caster is for some reason unable to attend a game, it is postponed, and the caster takes a cumulative –2 penalty to spell checks per postponement until the game days are made up for.
5
The Convention Circuit:  The followers of Pesh Joomang meet in many convocations and conventions dedicated to esoteric lore, adventure games, and other arcane subjects.  Whenever this patron taint is rolled, roll 1d7 and add the number of times that the taint has been previously rolled:  1, the convention comes to the caster’s home area in 1d3 days; 2-4, the convention is within 10 miles in 2d7 days; 5-6, the convention is 2d100 miles away in 2d14 days; 7-8, the convention is 5d100 miles away in 4d24 days; 9+ the convention is on another plane or world in 5d30 days.  A convention lasts 1d5 days, and costs 2d3 gp per day to attend.  For each convention fully attended, the caster gains a permanent +1 bonus to Luck.  For each convention fully missed, the caster takes a permanent –1 penalty to Luck.  Conventions which are partially attended do not alter Luck in either direction.  This patron taint can be rolled any number of times.
6
The Gate and Keeper:  Pesh Joomang is knowledgeable about an infinite number of patrons, including those of great scope, and those of minor province.  When this patron taint is rolled, Pesh Joomang introduces the caster to another patron, and, if the caster accepts, he is able to invoke that patron through Pesh Joomang, by using the invoke patron spell for Pesh Joomang (as described under Invoke Patron check results).  Accepting this invitation to power requires the caster to owe Pesh Joomang a favour, however.

Patron Spells:  Pesh Joomang

Pesh Joomang grants five unique spells, as follows:

Level 1:  Creatures of the Visual HieroglyphsPolyhedral Doom
Level 2:  Most Excellent Wall of Wailing WordsPesh Joomang’s Verdant Stalker
Level 3:  Mercurial Magic Do What Thou Will

Spellburn:  Pesh Joomang


Spellburn through Pesh Joomang reflects his nature, which is neither kind nor unkind, but filled with a sense of humour that does not always bode well for those upon who he focuses.  When a caster utilizes spellburn, roll 1d4 on the table, below, or use these ideas to craft a suitable event for your home campaign:


Roll
Spellburn Result
1
The spellburn is granted, with no loss of ability scores.  However, depending upon the amount of spellburn, corruption occurs.  Roll 1d8 and add the amount of spellburn:  2-5, minor corruption; 6-10, major corruption; 11-18 greater corruption; or 19+ greater corruption and patron taint.
2
Within a split second, the caster experiences what it is like to be a patron.  Another caster somewhere in the cosmos begs a boon, and Pesh Joomang takes it from the caster.  The caster only gains half the benefit of his spellburn; the other half goes to the other caster.  Roll 1d16; if the result is equal to or below the caster’s level, magical backlash heals the caster for a number of dice equal to the roll result.  This cannot bring the caster’s hit points over its normal maximum, however.
3
Powered by corruption:  Spellburn is granted, but if the caster has corruption, a random corruption effect is undone to empower the spellburn.  If the corruption is minor, the caster gains a +2 to the spellcheck.  If major, the caster gains +4.  If greater corruption is undone, the caster gains a +6 to the spellcheck.
4
Pesh Joomang causes another patron to supply the spellburn result.  The judge may either select a patron, or determine one randomly.

Sidebar:  Determing Patrons Randomly

There are five fully developed patrons in the core rulebook, and three simple entries for patrons that do not include information for spellburn, patron spells, and so on.  There are also thirteen fully developed patrons in Angels, Daemons, & Beings Between.  When you wish to roll a random patron, you may use the table below.  If you have access to other patrons, through other products or of your own devising, you may add them to the table, or devise a new table that better meets your campaign needs.

1d24
Random Patron
Random Patron For Spellburn
1
Ali Dahaka
Ali Dahaka
2
Arm of Vendel Reyune
Arm of Vendel Reyune
3
Bobugbubilz
Bobugbubilz
4
Enzazza, Queen of the Hive
Enzazza, Queen of the Hive
5
Four Maidens of Tylin
Four Maidens of Tylin
6
Hecate, Goddess of Witches
Hecate, Goddess of Witches
7
Hhaaashh-Lusss, Lord Duke of Reptiles
Hhaaashh-Lusss, Lord Duke of Reptiles
8
Ithha, Prince of Elemental Wind
King Halgaz Bekur
9
King Halgaz Bekur
King of Elfland
10
King of Elfland
Lavarial, Angel of the Temple
11
Lavarial, Angel of the Temple
Logos, the Perfect Form
12
Logos, the Perfect Form
Ptah-Ungurath, Opener of the Way
13
Obitu-Que
Radu, King of Rabbits
14
Ptah-Ungurath, Opener of the Way
Set-Utekh the Destroyer
15
Radu, King of Rabbits
Sezrekan
16
Set-Utekh the Destroyer
Three Fates
17
Sezrekan
Umwansh, Father of the Waves
18
Three Fates
Yan Oshoth, Revered Ancestor
19
Umwansh, Father of the Waves

20
Yan Oshoth, Revered Ancestor

21
Yddgrrl

22


23


24



Sidebar:  Artefacts of Pesh Joomang

Pesh Joomang is associated with two magical artefacts:  The Tunic of Pesh Joomang and the Buckle of Pesh Joomang.

The Tunic of Pesh Joomang is of well-spun white cloth, with red sleeves coming but midway to the forearms of the wearer.  Upon its breast is a black skull sigil.  Only a human or an elf may wear the Tunic, for it does not change sizes to match its wearer.   Any who wears this potent artefact gains a +2 bonus to all spell checks and Will saves, and gains a +4 bonus to AC.  Further, armour can be worn over the marvellous Tunic, although the fickle magic it commands causes the fumble die for the armour to increase by one step up the dice chain.  A creature wearing the Tunic has a –2 penalty to Luck so long as it is worn.  Further, others who learn of the Tunic are apt to desire it, potentially making the wearer a target of others.

The Buckle of Pesh Joomang is a brass buckle, of the type that might secure a belt or a baldric.  It is etched with a hideous three-eyed face.  Six strange runes within the mouth of the face deliver a message that even magic cannot unravel.  The Buckle can allow its wearer to reroll any one die roll at any time.  Each time this is done, though, one of the eyes closes.  When the third eye closes, the Buckle vanishes, reappearing somewhere else in the multiple universes, to be found and used by another adventurer.

Creatures of the Visual Hieroglyphics
Level:  1
Range:  30’
Duration:  Varies
Casting time:  1 round
Save:  None

General

Know that it is a qualification to those who would serve the great Pesh Joomang that they understand and appreciate certain visual hieroglyphs derived from denizens of the higher planes.  When this spell is cast, the wizard calls one or more of the creatures depicted in the visual hieroglyphs into corporeal existence, to serve the wizard for a time. 

It takes three rounds after the spell is cast for the creature(s) to fully manifest.  On the first round, they appear as though a light pencil sketch upon the very air.  On the second round, the lines of the hieroglyphs darken, and they are shaded into three dimensions.  On the third round, the image(s) gains colour and solidity.  On the fourth round, the creature(s) are able to act as directed by the caster.

These creatures are drawn from a pandect known as the Core Book of Pesh Joomang.  The caster may choose any result equal to, or below, the value of his spell check.  Know that the power of this spell summons at most the image of the 58th page of the Core Book, whereas the Core Book itself is said to be more than 450 pages long!  It is therefore supposed that a stronger version of this spell, perhaps a ritual known only to certain aspirants of Pesh Joomang, must somewhere exist.

Creatures summoned from the visual hieroglyphics always obey the caster to the best of their ability, although it has a 50% chance of being released from control if given a suicidal command, or a command that is contrary to its nature.  Due to the nature of the summoning, the caster cannot directly harm a creature he summons.


Manifestation


See below.


1

Lost, failure, and patron taint.
2-11
Failure.  Lost.
12-15
A dim-witted humanoid creature is summoned from page 12 of the Core Book of Pesh Joomang.  This creature has long claws and sharp tusks, but its predominant attack comes from its enormous axe, which is too large to be wielded by a creature smaller than its 8-foot height.  The dim humanoid rolls criticals as a giant, but is 50% likely to make a mistake when attempting to carry out any average order the caster gives.  The more complex the order, the higher the chance of misunderstanding, and the less complex the order, the smaller the chance.  The creature serves for 1d7+CL rounds after it is fully manifested, and then crumples up like a paper drawing and disappears.  Dim-witted humanoid: Init –2; Atk axe +5 melee (1d10+5); AC 12; HD 3d8; MV 30’; Act 1d20; SP critical hits 1d3 on Table G; SV Fort +3, Ref –2, Will –2; AL N.
16-17
2d4+CL enormous scorpions are summed from page 17 of the Book.  These scorpions are about 3 feet long.  Their stings contain a poison that causes 1d4 temporary Stamina damage unless a DC 14 Fort save is successful.  The enormous scorpions serve for 1d7+CL and then appear to be erased from existence, as a chalk drawing is erased from a chalkboard.  Enormous scorpion:  Init +0; Atk 2 claws +3 melee (1d5) or sting +0 melee (1d3 plus poison); AC 12; HD 1d10; MV 20’; Act 1d20; SP infravision 30’, poison; SV Fort +2, Ref +3, Will +0; AL N.
18-21
4d7+CL tool imps are summoned from page 21 of the Book.  These imps appear to be semi-humanoid crosses between birds and bats.  They can attack using any tools available of any sort – hand drills, scissors, knives, or even heavy spoons.  They take only half damage from mundane weapons.  Tool imps take great delight in tormenting intelligent beings.  They serve for 1d3+CL turns, and then simply vanish.  Tool imp:  Init +2; Atk tool +0 melee (1d3); AC 16; HD 1d4; MV 10’ or fly 30’; Act 1d20; SP infravision 60’, half damage from non-magical attacks; SV Fort +0, Ref +6, Will +3; AL C. 
22-23
The learned skeleton is summoned from page 23 of the Core Book.  Although it physically indistinguishable from any other animated skeleton, it loves to discourse on subjects, and even in the midst of combat can be seen with hand on hip, one finger in the air, lecturing on some esoteric subject.  When not answering a specific question (see below), it can drone on about any subject, causing all who can hear it to make a DC 8 Will save each round or lose their action as their eyes glaze over.  Creatures that cannot hear or understand the learned skeleton are immune to this attack.   This does not use the creature’s action.

There is actually only one learned skeleton – even if “destroyed” in one encounter, the next time it is summoned it remembers all that occurred up to the point of its destruction. 

The learned skeleton serves for 1d5+CL turns or until the caster calls upon the skeleton to answer three questions.  The learned skeleton knows the right answer to any question asked 85% of the time.  if the caster is not careful, the learned skeleton will spend the entire duration of the spell discoursing on the answer to a single question, and possibly never actually get to the information the caster desires.  When the skeleton is released, it slowly fades away. 

Learned skeleton:  Init +0; Atk claw +0 melee (1d3) or by weapon +0 melee; AC 12; HD 4d12; MV 30’; Act 1d20; SP un-dead, half damage from piercing and slashing weapons, drone, answer questions; SV Fort +0, Ref +0, Will +4; AL L.
24-26
A dire minotaur is summoned from page 26 of the Core Book of Pesh Joomang.  This minotaur wears large metal bracers and an armoured war kilt, and bears a large battle axe.  Like any minotaur, a dire minotaur can charge to do an extra 1d8 with its gore attack, is never surprised, and gains a +6 bonus to any Will save against mind-affecting spells.  A dire minotaur loves nothing more than to savagely slay other living beings.  It will serve for a maximum of 1d7+CL turns, but if a turn goes by without combat, the creature has a 50% chance of being released from service.  When its service is over, the dire minotaur rips a hole in reality as though it were paper, and steps through.  The hole seals behind it.  Quick characters can attempt a DC 15 Reflex save to step through the hole with the dire minotaur, but this will bring the character to the minotaur’s own plane – an endless labyrinth in which the character will be hunted by the minotaur until one or both are dead.  Dire minotaur:  Init +8; Atk gore +8 melee (1d10+6) or axe +8 melee (1d12+6); AC 16; HD 10d8+10; MV 30’; Act 2d20; SP bull charge, never surprised, +6 vs. mind-affecting; SV Fort +8, Ref +10, Will +4; AL C.
27-31
3d5+CL writhing unholy tentacles are summoned from page 29 of the Book.  These unholy tentacles come from the ground, a chasm, or some other space as determined by the judge.  They are covered with suckers that drip a foul and poisonous ichor.  A creature that is struck by a tentacle must succeed in a DC 10 Reflex save or be entangled, taking an automatic 2d5 damage each round until the character escapes with a DC 10 Strength check or by slaying the tentacle.  Any creature that takes damage from a tentacle must also make a DC 10 Fort save, or take 1d4 points of Strength damage from the unholy ichor.  A Lawful cleric may Turn these tentacles.  These tentacles remain for 1d5+CL turns, then collapse into a pool of foul-smelling mucus.  Unholy tentacle:  Init +2; Atk slam +5 melee (1d5); AC 14; HD 4d12; MV 20’; Act 1d20; SP 15’ reach, poisonous ichor, constriction; SC Fort +10, Ref +6, Will +2; AL C.
32+
The immortal death worm is summoned from page 58 of the Core Book.  This bug-eyed creature is a full 20’ long, with four tentacles at its forward end and six more at its rear.  It moves by hunching along like a gigantic inchworm, with the aid of two rows of gigantic suckers along its abdomen.  No matter how horrendous the wounds suffered by the death worm, it cannot be slain, for it is immortal.  If brought to 0 hp, it is dormant for 3d8 rounds while it regenerates 1d3 hp per round.

The death worm’s senses are incredibly keen, so that it can detect any living thing within 30’ of it.  It has infravision to a range of 120’.  On a roll of 20+ with its bite attack, it pulls its victim into its mouth, where it takes automatic bite damage each round without costing one of the death worm’s actions.  A victim of the worm’s tentacle attack must make a DC 12 Fort save or be paralyzed for 1d5 rounds.

The immortal death worm is always hungry, and must consume a living creature each turn or have a 50% chance of being released from service.  It otherwise serves for 1d4 hours, and then fades slowly away.

Immortal death worm:  Init +0; Atk bite +8 melee (3d7) or tentacle +5 melee (1d10 plus paralysis); AC 12; HD 8d10+16; MV 30’ or climb 10’; Act 4d24; SP infravision 120’, detect living 30’, immortal, pull into mouth, paralysis; SV Fort +6, Ref –4, Will +7; AL C.





Polyhedral Doom
Level:  1
Range:  120’
Duration:  Instantaneous
Casting time:  Action
Save:  Reflex half

General

It is well known that Pesh Joomang has a great love for polyhedral shapes of unusual types.  While many believe that this is related only to their use in the strange games played by followers of The Gate and the Keeper,  in truth these shapes can be used to mete out cosmic weal or woe.  When this spell is cast, one or more gigantic polyhedral shapes appear, dropping down upon foes or welling up from the wounds of allies.  The number, type, and size of the shapes depends upon the spell check result.

A shape that does damage to a foe determines the damage done by rolling a die with the same number of sides.  For example, a 16-sided shape does 1d16 damage.  Each target is allowed a Reflex save (DC equal to the spell check result) for half damage.

A shape that wells up from the wounds of an ally can heal damage equal to the roll of a die with the same number of sides (but cannot cause a result higher than the target’s original hit points).  Any remainder is not lost, however, but takes the form of “cosmic weal” – essentially giving the target a +1 to all die rolls for a number of rounds equal to the remainder.  For example, if 1d6 is rolled for an ally that has taken 3 hp damage, and the result is a “5”, all damage is healed, and the ally gains a +1 bonus to all rolls for 2 rounds. 

Note that, if an ally is unwounded, the shape will damage him as it emerges.  In this case, the ally takes half the roll in damage (rounded up), and the remainder is the number of rounds the character gains the +1 bonus for.

Manifestation:






Roll 1d5, 1d6, 1d7, and 1d8.  The shapes are (1d5):  (1) green, (2) red, (3) orange, (4) brown, or (5) purple.  They are (1d6):  (1) tiny, about ¼ inch across, (2) small, about 1 inch across, (3-4) medium (1d6 inches across), (5) large (1d3 feet across), or (6) huge (2d7 feet across)   Once the spell is cast, they remain in existence for (1d7):  (1-3) 1d3 rounds, (4) 1d4 turns, (5) 1d6 hours, (6) 1d7 days, or (7) forever.  The shapes are actually made of (1d8):  (1) wood, (2) plastic, (3) granite, (4) glass, (5) brick, (6) iron, (7) copper, or (8) gold.


1

Lost, failure, and patron taint.
2-11
Failure.  Lost.
12-15
1d3 12-sided polyhedral shapes are created.
16-17
1d4 14-sided polyhedral shapes are created.
18-21
1d5 16-sided polyhedral shapes are created.
22-23
1d6 20-sided polyhedral shapes are created.
24-26
1d7 24-sided polyhedral shapes are created.
27-31
1d8 30-sided polyhedral shapes are created.
32+
1d10 100 –sided polyhedral shapes are created.





Most Excellent Wall of Wailing Words
Level:  2
Range:  30’
Duration:  Variable
Casting time:  1 turn
Save:  Will to negate

General

When this spell is cast, the wizard summons an invisible wall composed of sound.  The sound itself has unusual properties:  although it can be heard within 10’ of the wall, the words seem too faint and indistinct to be made out.  Only by actually daring to enter the wall can most creatures determine what words the wall is composed of (although the judge may rule that especially keen-eared creatures can make out the actual words without actually entering the wall).  It is said that the most excellent wall speaks with the very words and voice of Pesh Joomang.

The caster can choose any result equal to, or less than, the spell check result.

The wall lasts for a period of time determined by the spell check result, or until a sentient creature enters the wall and triggers its effect.  Deaf or non-sentient creatures are immune to, and do not trigger, the wall when passing through it.  A creature that stoppers its ears in some manner gains a +4 to its saving throw, and does not trigger the wall if the save is successful.


Manifestation

See below.

1

Lost, failure, and patron taint.
2-11
Lost.  Failure.
12-15
Failure, but the spell is not lost.
16-17
There aren’t any true “rules” of magic – This wall lasts 3d10 + CL turns, or until triggered.  Non-spellcasters can trigger the wall without harm, but a spellcaster must make a Will save or be unable to cast spells until a Will save succeeds.  The creature may attempt a new Will save once each day.  This wall is 10’ long by 10’ high, and 1’ thick.
18-21
Creatures roam the night, as do brigands and savages – This wall lasts 3d10 + CL turns, or until triggered,  The creature who triggers this wall must make a Will save or become afraid of the dark, taking a –2 penalty to all attack rolls, saves, spell checks, and skill checks when in dark conditions.  The creature may attempt a new save each day; this condition lasts until one such save succeeds.  This wall is 20’ long by 10’ high and 1’ thick, and can be shaped as the caster desires, so long as it is a continuous line.
22-23
Danger and excitement do not motivate all men – This wall lasts 3d10 + CL turns, or until triggered.  The creature who triggers this wall must make a Will save or lose the desire to confront danger or seek excitement.  In situations of danger and excitement, the creature takes a –4 penalty to all attack rolls, saves, spell checks, and skill checks.  The creature may attempt a new save each   day; this condition lasts until one such save succeeds.  This wall is 20’ long by 10’ high and 1’ thick, and can be shaped as the caster desires, so long as it is a continuous line.
24-26
What lies past the next valley?  None can be sure – This wall lasts 3d6 hours, or until triggered by CL creatures.  Any creature who triggers this wall experiences a sense of extreme wander lust, and unless a Will save succeeds, will be unable to recover spells, heal damage, or gain any other benefit of rest unless at least 10 miles distant from the place it slept the last time it was able to recover these benefits.  If the initial save is failed, those affected gain a new save on every subsequent night; the effects last until one of these saves succeeds.  This wall is up to 30’ long by 10’ high and 1’ thick, and can be shaped as the caster desires, so long as it is a continuous line.
27-31
The universe does not reward those who challenge the fates blindly! – This wall lasts 3d6 hours, or until triggered by CL creatures.  Those who pass through this wall and fail their Will save suffer a reduced die (as per the die chain) on all saves, attack rolls, spell checks, and skill checks.  This penalty can be offset by consider the consequences of challenging the fates with each of the creature’s actions, resulting in half normal movement speed and always acting last in a combat round.  At any given time, the creature can choose to act normally and suffer a reduced die, or act cautiously and suffer the related penalties to movement and initiative.  If the initial save is failed, a new save is allowed one each week, and the effects last until one of these saves succeeds.  This wall is up to 40’ long by 10’ high and 1’ thick, and can be shaped as the caster desires, so long as it is a continuous line.
32-33
All magic items are unique – This wall lasts 3d6 days, or until triggered by CL creatures.  Each creature that fails its Will save has the effects of any magic item it carries changed by the wild magic of the wailing words.  At the very least, the judge will roll or select a Mercurial Magic effect to occur when each item is activated, but judges are encouraged to be inventive and devious.  Not every change will be negative – the judge may decide to secretly roll a Luck check for the character for each magic item carried, and let the result determine if the item is changed for weal or woe.  The judge may determine that certain powerful artefacts are unchanged, or are changed only minimally, of course.  The magical properties of any affected item are permanently changed.  This wall is up to 40’ long by 10’ high and 1’ thick, and can be shaped as the caster desires, so long as it is a continuous line.
34+
It is generally unwise to draw the attention of higher-order beings, lest their scrutiny find you wanting – This wall is permanent, lasting until the end of time, and is perilous to both the caster and those who would pass through it.  Any creature passing through the wall must make a Will save or be judged by the higher-order being (such as a god, patron, or other supernatural creature of the overworld, underworld, or parallel world to which the wall is linked). 

Each such wall is linked to only a single being, but the caster has no control over whom or what this being will be.  The judge may choose, or randomly determine a patron or deity – as a general rule, 2 in 7 such walls link to gods, 4 in 7 to patrons, and 1 in 7 to truly unique beings that refuse to act as either.  When a creature comes to the attention of this higher-order being, that being scrutinizes it, punishing or rewarding it according to the being’s nature.  There are very few limits to what the being can do to a creature as it passes through the wall, and there is no save against the whims of the being.  The judge should take the role of the being, and determine a fitting reward or punishment based upon the nature of the creature passing through the wall. 

The caster must also make a Will save, or draw the attention of the same higher-order being as a result of creating the wall.  If the caster does draw the being’s attention, he is scrutinized and adjudged, just as if he had passed through the wall.

This wall is up to 60’ long by 10’ high and 1’ thick, and can be shaped as the caster desires, so long as it is a continuous line.



Pesh Joomang’s Verdant Stalker
Level:  2
Range:  Special
Duration:  1d6 + CL days
Casting time:  2 turns
Save:  None

General

When this spell is cast, the wizard summons a plant elemental from a far plane where nature is wilder than it is at home.  The summoned creature, a verdant stalker, appears something like a cross between a leopard and a wolf, but it is composed entirely of plant matter, appearing almost as a living and animate topiary creature.

Regardless of the spell check result, all verdant stalkers have the following characteristics.  First, they are camouflaged in any area of naturally greenery, and in these areas have the ability to remain hidden until they are within 30’ of a target 80% of the time.  Second, all verdant stalkers take no damage from piercing weapons, and half damage from any slashing weapons that are not specifically designed to chop (as is an axe or machete).  Thirdly, all verdant stalkers are vulnerable to fire and cold, taking +2 points of damage for every die of damage done to them from these sources.  Finally, no verdant stalker can enter more than a half-mile into an area that is completely devoid of photosynthetic plant life, and are thus barred from truly desert or arctic regions, or the depths beneath the earth. 

When summoned, a verdant stalker must be given a single target, which the caster must supply some remnant, clothing, or similar trace of.  The verdant stalker will always know exactly where that target is, so long as it is on the same plane, in both distance and direction.  The stalker will then move as quickly as possible towards its target.  If it reaches its target before the spell duration expires, the stalker will attack it, attempting to slay it if possible, and to bring proof of its accomplishment back to the caster.  The verdant stalker will attack no other being during this time, except in defence, and will not pursue creatures that flee – apart from its target.

Casting this spell requires a minimum of 1 point of spellburn, which does not affect the spell check.


Manifestation

As below.

1

Lost, failure, and patron taint.
2-11
Lost.  Failure.
12-15
Failure, but the spell is not lost.
16-17
The verdant stalker is the size of a lynx.  It gains no special powers.  Verdant Stalker:  Init +0; Atk bite +0 melee (1d4); AC 14; HD 2d12; MV 30’; Act 1d20; SP camouflage, immune to piercing, half damage from non-chopping slashing weapons, fire and cold vulnerability, track target; SV Fort +4, Ref +3, Will +4; AL L.
18-21
The verdant stalker is the size of a wolf.  It gains no special powers.   Verdant Stalker:  Init +1; Atk bite +1 melee (1d6); AC 13; HD 3d12; MV 30’; Act 1d20; SP camouflage, immune to piercing, half damage from non-chopping slashing weapons, fire and cold vulnerability, track target; SV Fort +6, Ref +3, Will +4; AL L.
22-23
The verdant stalker is the size of a lion.  In addition to the attributes of all such beings, it can pass through undergrowth, hedges, or other thickly non-magical plant growths without impeding its movement or damaging the area passed through.  Verdant Stalker:  Init +3; Atk bite +3 melee (1d7+3); AC 14; HD 5d12; MV 40’; Act 2d20; SP camouflage, immune to piercing, half damage from non-chopping slashing weapons, fire and cold vulnerability, track target, pass through plants; SV Fort +8, Ref +2, Will +6; AL L.
24-26
The verdant stalker is the size of a horse.  In addition to the powers above, the stalker can generate two tentacle-like vines from its “shoulders”, with which it can lash targets up to 15’ away.  Verdant Stalker:  Init +3; Atk bite +5 melee (1d10+5) or vine lash +3 ranged (1d4); AC 14; HD 7d12; MV 50’; Act 2d20; SP camouflage, immune to piercing, half damage from non-chopping slashing weapons, fire and cold vulnerability, track target, pass through plants; SV Fort +8, Ref +2, Will +6; AL L.
27-31
The verdant stalker is 15’ long.  In addition to the powers above, the verdant stalker’s vines can lash targets as far as 20’ away and, on a successful hit, can entangle a target unless it makes a DC 10 Reflex save to avoid entanglement.  Once entangled, a target must succeed in a DC 14 Strength check (using an action die) to break free.  Verdant Stalker:  Init +5; Atk bite +7 melee (1d12+7) or vine lash +5 ranged (1d5); AC 14; HD 10d12; MV 50’; Act 2d20; SP camouflage, immune to piercing, half damage from non-chopping slashing weapons, fire and cold vulnerability, track target, pass through plants, entangle; SV Fort +10, Ref +0, Will +8; AL L.
32-33
The verdant stalker is 20’ long.  The verdant stalker has all of the powers above, and in addition can teleport via plants as a move action, disappearing in one area with robust plant life to reappear almost instantly in another area, which also must contain robust plant life, within 200’.  Verdant Stalker:  Init +5; Atk bite +8 melee (3d6+8) or vine lash +5 ranged (2d4); AC 16; HD 14d12; MV 60’; Act 3d20; SP camouflage, immune to piercing, half damage from non-chopping slashing weapons, fire and cold vulnerability, track target, pass through plants, teleport via plants, entangle; SV Fort +14, Ref –2, Will +12; AL L.
34+
The verdant stalker is 20’ long.  The stalker has all of the powers above, but its vines have thorns that drip a paralytic sap, so that any creature lashed by them must make a DC 10 Fort save or take 1d3 points of temporary Agility damage.  Verdant Stalker:  Init +5; Atk bite +8 melee (3d6+8) or vine lash +5 ranged (2d4); AC 18; HD 16d12; MV 60’; Act 3d20; SP camouflage, immune to piercing, half damage from non-chopping slashing weapons, fire and cold vulnerability, track target, pass through plants, teleport via plants, entangle, paralytic sap; SV Fort +14, Ref –2, Will +16; AL L.




Mercurial Magic Do What Thou Will
Level:  3
Range:  Varies
Duration:  Varied
Casting time:  1 round
Save:  Varies

General

Magic is not predictable, and by truly embracing the unpredictable nature of magic, the aspirant of Pesh Joomang can wield power far beyond what would otherwise be possible.  When this spell is cast, it triggers another spell effect immediately, regardless of the normal casting time of the spell.  The judge should adapt the outcome to take circumstances and materials into account; if a magic sword spell is triggered, for example, there must be a suitable blade available to take the magic. 

If this spell is cast successfully, another spell check is made for the triggered spell, but the result must always be the minimum to pass.  If a natural “1” is rolled, the effects of both the fumble and the minimum effective spell casting occur.  If a cleric spell is indicated, and a natural “1” is rolled, the caster suffers either greater corruption or patron taint, with an equal chance of each occurring.

If the caster already has the triggered spell, his mercurial magic roll is not used for that spell.   Mercurial magic indicated for any triggered spell is linked only to that single casting of the spell.  Variables are chosen by the caster, just as if he had cast the spell triggered.  Spellburn cannot be used to increase the result of the triggered spell.

When this spell causes a patron spell to be triggered, the spell check is rolled with a –2 penalty to the check.  When this spell causes a clerical spell to be triggered, that spell check is rolled with a –4 penalty to the check.


Manifestation

As below.

1

Lost, failure, and patron taint.
2-11
Lost.  Failure.
12-15
Failure, but the spell is not lost.
16-17
A random wizard spell of level is triggered.  Roll 1d3 to determine the spell’s level.  Roll a Mercurial Magic effect for that spell, using the caster’s current Luck modifier.
18-21
Roll 1d3.  On a roll of 1-2, a random wizard spell of level 1-3 is triggered, as above, but on a roll of 3, a random level 1 cleric spell is triggered.  A clerical spell also has a random Mercurial Magic effect, but this is rolled at a –10 penalty.
22-26
Roll 1d5.  On a roll of 1-3, a random wizard spell is triggered (roll 1d4 to determine level).  On a roll of 4-5, a random cleric spell is triggered (roll 1d3 to determine level).  Regardless of what type of spell is triggered, it comes with 1d3 Mercurial effects, which are rolled using the caster’s current Luck modifier.
27-33
Roll 1d6.  On a roll of 1-3, a random wizard spell is triggered (level 1d5).  On a roll of 4-6, a random cleric spell is triggered (level 1d4).  Regardless of what type of spell is triggered, it comes with 1d3 Mercurial effects, which are rolled using the caster’s current Luck modifier.
34-35
Roll 1d6.  On a roll of 1-3, a random wizard spell is triggered (level 1d4+1).  On a roll of 4-6, a random cleric spell is triggered (level 1d3+1).  Regardless of what type of spell is triggered, it comes with 1d3 Mercurial effects, which are rolled using the caster’s current Luck modifier.
36+
Roll 1d6.  On a roll of 1-3, a random wizard spell is triggered (level 1d3+2).  On a roll of 4-6, a random cleric spell is triggered (level 1d4+1).  Regardless of what type of spell is triggered, it comes with a single Mercurial effect, which are rolled using the caster’s current Luck modifier, with a further +10 bonus to the roll.





Written by Daniel J. Bishop

Editing:  Daniel J. Bishop, Michael Bishop

2 comments:

  1. I was a contributor at the Pesh Joomang level...I appreciate your efforts and communications regarding this otherwise sad story.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for your comment, and I am sorry that the project turned out as it did.

      If you didn't notice, the "Creatures of the Visual Hieroglyphics" spell stats creatures who are pictured in the Core Rulebook on pages within the spell result range.

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